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The College, Nottingham and the UK

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Nottingham College is a vibrant, cosmopolitan college - located in the heart of a great student city.

Our educational history spans many years, combining traditional quality standards with innovative teaching and technology.

Today, successful growth has resulted in the college occupying 10 major sites - three of which are in the city centre and with a further eight spread through the larger Nottingham conurbation area. All of our sites are welcoming, with their own unique atmosphere and each being a great place to meet and make new friends - not just from the UK but from countries worldwide. Find out more about our college campuses here.

Nottingham College has created an excellent learning environment to ensure each and every student has the opportunity to succeed. Our facilities include: on-site Learning Centres offering library services and computer, internet and printing facilities; vocational training workshops; refectories; restaurants and our health and beauty salons.

International students have made Nottingham College (ncn and Central before that) their choice for over thirty years. Today, students study on a range of courses from A level and pre-degree through to Higher Education with our Foundation Degree and BA top-up programmes. See our International course pages for more information.

The International Office has a dedicated team of staff to support students through their UK experience.

About Nottingham

Situated right at the heart of the country, Nottingham is a vibrant city in which to work, study, live, play and invest.

Rich in opportunities, culture and style, the City is constantly changing and yet retains it balance between old and new. Nottinghamshire has always been a favourite destination with students - both from the UK and overseas.
The reputation of its colleges and universities is first class and the county has a great deal to offer students, visitors and residents alike.

Nottinghamshire is perhaps best known as the home of the legendary Robin Hood and Sherwood Forest but the county’s heritage extends far beyond the Merry Men!

Heritage
The City’s treasures also include Wollaton Hall, an Elizabethan stately home complete with a 500-acre deer park; Byron’s ancestral home, Newstead Abbey; and D.H. Lawrence’s birthplace. Nottingham also boasts its own castle, built by William the Conqueror and a number of National Trust properties either in the county or within easy reach. The historic Lace Market still retains the ornate warehouses built by the Victorian lace barons - one of which is now home to Nottingham College’s City Campus.

Nottingham Goose Fair
Every October sees the Goose Fair come to Nottingham - a tradition that goes back over 700 years! The Goose Fair is now an enormous funfair, however, historically it was a fair where farmers sold their geese at market and a chance for the people of Nottingham to celebrate St. Matthew’s Day (September 21). With the revision of the calendar in 1752 and the omission of 11 days from September, the date of Goose Fair was switched to October 2 and this remained the starting date until 1875. For centuries, Goose Fair was held in the heart of the city on the Market Square but due to its increasing size and the amount of congestion it created, a new site was found. Today Goose Fair is held on the Forest Recreation Ground to the north of the Old Market Square and just around the corner from Nottingham College’s Clarendon campus on Mansfield Road.

Arts and cultural scene
Nottingham has a thriving arts and cultural scene. Nottingham Castle houses the first municipal museum and art gallery to be established outside London, the Angel Row, Bonington - all showcase influential artists. The Lakeside Arts Centre also hosts art, music, comedy and drama and houses the Djanogly Art Gallery.

The City boasts two major theatres that attract some of the biggest names and shows: the Theatre Royal is a traditional Victorian theatre and the Nottingham Playhouse is renowned for innovative drama.

The Royal Concert Hall is a versatile venue staging pop, rock and classical concerts, opera, ballet, comedy and dance. The 9,500-capacity Nottingham Arena and National Ice Centre also attracts some of the world’s finest performers.

The Nottingham College Arts Centre is a regular host to innovative student drama, dance and music events. It also stages shows by visiting professional companies at very reasonable prices.

The Royal Philharmonic, Opera North and National Film Theatre all have their regional bases in Nottingham.

Nightlife
With a great reputation for its nightlife, Nottingham attracts people from all over the country eager to experience the buzzing mix of clubs, bars, pubs and restaurants.

There is an ever-increasing array of cafe bars and clubs within the historic Lace Market and Hockley areas, whilst on the opposite side of the City Centre, the re-developed Castle Wharf area is proving to be a popular haunt.

Cuisine
Benefiting from the lively mix of cultures attracted to Nottingham, the City boasts a wealth of restaurants and cuisines. From traditional English to high class French, to Thai, Vegetarian, Japanese and many more, you can’t fail to find a meal to suit your appetite!

Due to the many Catering and Hospitality students at Nottingham College, there is an excellent training restaurant at the College - The Adams Restaurant & Brasserie at our City campus - open to the public and offering high quality cuisine at sensible prices.

Shopping
Nottingham is one of the country’s most stylish cities and a first choice for clothing companies expanding outside London. Home of Paul Smith, one of fashion’s most famous figures, Nottingham combines all the main High Street stores with designer boutiques and unique character shops.

For a less hectic shopping experience, you could also try the smaller market towns, such as historic Mansfield, Newark or Bingham, if you want to avoid the hustle and bustle of the City.

Sports
With cricket at Trent Bridge, an International Tennis Centre, the National Ice Centre, motor racing at Donnington Park, the National Watersports Centre at Holme Pierrepoint and not forgetting Nottingham Forest and Notts County Football Clubs, Nottinghamshire really is a major sporting centre!

If you prefer to participate rather than spectate, Nottinghamshire offers an extensive range of leisure and fitness centres, swimming pools, sporting clubs and societies.

Innovation and enterprise
The city has an innovative business community where networks and partnerships thrive. With millions of pounds of new investment, Nottingham looks to the future with confidence.

Major organisations such as Capital One and the Inland Revenue have relocated to Nottingham in recent years and Boots, Speedo and Experian are well-established in the City.

Getting away from it all
Nottingham is surrounded by beautiful countryside. Eastwards from the City, lies the tranquil Vale of Belvoir with the Lincolnshire Wolds beyond. To the west, lie the rolling hills of the Peak District - a regular haunt of ramblers walking the Pennine Way. The north-west is home to the ancient oak woodland of Sherwood Forest and to the south can be found the quiet fields and farmlands of Rutland. You don’t have to travel far to find peace and quiet in areas of outstanding natural beauty.

Education
The reputations of Nottingham University and Nottingham Trent University attract a large number of students to Nottingham. In addition, Nottingham has several colleges offering a wide range of exciting further and higher education courses. Nottingham College is a leading light in the City’s education sector providing thousands of opportunities each year.

Transport
The Nottingham Express Transit (NET) Tram carries passengers from Hucknall or Phoenix Park to the City centre. There are 23 stops along the route - taking in six Park and Ride sites (Hucknall, Bulwell, Moor Bridge, Wilkinson Street and The Forest).

In the city centre, there are stops at Royal Centre (for the Theatre Royal, Royal Concert Hall and The Cornerhouse), Old Market Square, in the heart of Nottingham and Lace Market, for the National Ice Centre and Hockley.

The trams are fast, frequent and make it easy for disabled users to embark and disembark. The NET system is integrated with Trent Barton buses offering Mango travel tickets, EasyRider smartcards and link bus routes. You need to purchase your tickets from the machines on each platform, or swipe your mango travel card before boarding the tram.

Nottingham City Centre is served by NCT buses (Nottingham City Transport) from all Nottingham suburbs and other bus companies run services from the outlying towns and villages (Trent Barton and Arriva).

If you want to travel further afield, East Midlands Trains and London Midland run train services throughout the Midlands and beyond.

East Midlands Airport is the region’s international airport, with domestic and international flights to many destinations.

Places of interest
Things to do and places of interest in the Nottingham area:

Please note: Nottingham College is not responsible for the content of external websites, nor the opinions expressed therein.

About the UK

The UK, officially the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, is made up of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

The UK has a population of approximately 60 million people and is the world’s fourth largest trading nation. The UK is a Constitutional Monarchy, ruled by Queen Elizabeth the Second. The country is governed by Parliament, with Theresa May as the current Prime Minister. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have their own National Assemblies, devolved from centralised government in London.

Geography
The UK is an island separated from mainland Europe by the English Channel and the North Sea, as well as from Ireland by the Irish Sea. England is linked to France by the Channel Tunnel however.

England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are characterised by great geographical contrasts - large tracts of open countryside, wild moorlands and mountainous regions, flat lowlands and heavily built-up urban areas. The climate varies greatly from month to month and region to region too - no wonder the British are obsessed by the weather, we never know what its going to do!

Home of innovation
The UK is commonly acknowledged as being amongst the best in the world when it comes to invention and innovation.

British inventors include Michael Faraday (electric light), Tim Berners-Lee (the World Wide Web), Charles Babbage (The Difference Engine - an early computer), Trevor Baylis (the clockwork radio), Alan Turing (modern mathematical computing), Robert Stephenson (steam locomotion), Christopher Cockerell (the hovercraft), The Earl of Sandwich (the sandwich), Charles MacIntosh (the raincoat) and The Duke of Wellington (the Wellington Boot) to name but a few.

British innovators in the fields of Science and Technology include Sir Isaac Newton (many scientific discoveries and theories including the Theory of Gravity), Isambard Kingdom Brunel (great works of engineering), Edmund Cartwright (mechanisation of the weaving industry), and John Stringfellow (pioneer of powered flight).

Sport and culture
Football, Cricket, Rugby, Boxing, Formula 1 Motor Racing - all part of the UK’s legacy.

The UK is still pre-eminent in Football with many of the top teams based in England. Teams such as Arsenal, Chelsea and Manchester United are still world class.

In the field of Culture, Britain has produced many visionary musicians, composers, painters, thinkers and literary figures, including The Beatles, Benjamin Britten, Ralph Vaughan Williams, David Hockney, John Constable, Damien Hirst, Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein, William Shakespeare, Lord Byron, Charles Dickens, the Bronte Sisters, George Eliot, Agatha Christie, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, JRR Tolkien, JK Rowling and Martin Amis.

The UK has also made a great contribution to the field of popular culture, with many British bands and singers; actors, actresses and film directors; fashion designers and other celebrities becoming household names the world over.